Some Reflections on the Nativity of Erich Fromm

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I wish I could have more time to spend on analyzing the chart of Erich Fromm, especially from the view point of ‘Faith & Religion’, and I hope I will do that in near future. For now, I just want to point several factors that come into my mind in my first look at his chart. Actually, it is not a first look, but first look after some time, to say it like that. You know, the learning process of particular subject is like that, you are looking at the same chart every time with new eyes, with new principles learned in your mind and with new experiences in a slightly different way than was done previously.

Erich Fromm had enormous impact on me in my early 20’s when I started to read passionately about the world we live in. His thoughts are really very often on the spot, whether he analysis the society we live in, or the individual lives of ours and the way we live them.

Erich Fromm grew up in Orthodox Jewish family, family with respectful Rabbis in their ancestry. As a young man he studied with several well known German Rabbis and somewhere about his late twenties he turned completely into the secular philosophy, stepping on the path of becoming one of the world’s most influential humanistic philosophers/psychologists.

The first thing I’ve noticed in his chart is South Node on the cusp of the 9th house. The Medieval astrological delineation of such position [since the SN was regarded like a malefic influence] would be that the native will lose his religion. The common sign on the cusp of the 9th house shows that the native ‘will constantly revise his ideas about God’ and I remember I have read somewhere [I will find the source if in the future I prepare more wider entry for his nativity on my blog] that toward the last days of his life he became kind of religiously inclined, although this may easily be living religiously in a secular way, as living the religious experience as such without the idea of God. The fact that he constantly revised his ideas about God is present in every book of his. His religious upbringing didn’t allow him to completely forgot about the religious life, religious experience and the idea of God; and even though he looked at the idea of God from historical, evolutionary, psychological perspective, the thing is that his thoughts were constantly preoccupied with this idea in one way or another.

One can’t help noticing the accent on 3rd house. We have Jupiter several degrees to the cusp of the third in its own sign, and in 3rd by counting. North Node and then comes the Moon. Saturn is in 4th by counting but in 3rd by division and Saturn is especially important since as exalted lord having its testimony to the sign of the ascendant will govern the affairs of the native [Venus as Lady of Ascendant, being in aversion to it]. This Saturn being in its own sign, oriental to the Sun, in its proper light, Lord of the Fortune in pivotal sign but third by division, gives indications for a deep thinker.

The third is quite an interesting house. Valens associates it with ‘priest or priestess of the great goddess Moon’ [hiereus theas megistēs ē hiereia].
Rhetorius associates the 3rd with religious worship (thrēskeuma).
In pagan societies (outside the monotheistic Judaism, Christianity and later Islam) the word ‘hiereus’ was used to denote priest or one who offers sacrifice to the gods.

Because of the complementarity of the opposite houses, this house was also seen as indicating faith and religion, but because of the opposition to the 9th house, for the Medieval ones, was especially associated to those who oppose the monotheistic regime like different sects, and in modern times, could we say the secular philosophies? It is a very broad subject as to whether we should put the secularistic ideas in to the 9th house, or we should put them in 3rd as opposing the God or the official religions. For this purpose I want to just note that there is accent in this nativity on 3rd house. That he was a ‘priest’ of the modern humanistic sociology, psychology and let’s say ‘religion’, it is without doubt.

Just some morning reflections🙂

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